Archive for January, 2010

Some more prayers from the Rogation of the Ninevites… Wednesday

January 27, 2010

This is the last part of my copy and paste {with reformatting} of translations from Kaldu.org… The Wednesday page has readings as well as the meditations.

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday

A little explanation for people unfamiliar with this service…  This is not the full service as in the books, but a good amount of translation into English.  I am so happy to see Fr. Andy and the rest of our priests in our diocese working hard to bring a lot of our spirituality out of the Syriac of the Hudra into English for many to rejoice in.  Fr. Andy also translated our Qdam waBathar/”Before and After” into English.  It can be found in Amazon here. God bless him and all our clergy and their helpers in these works.

So, in these three posts, you will see the first couple of lines of the meditations are italicized.  Those lines are repeated as the refrains after each paragraph.  Yes, the entire service is sung… even the long sections called “Readings” which are not in these posts.  They are often very somber toned but nonetheless beautiful hymns.  With the tone and the wording, if I am paying attention to what we are saying and doing, I have to hold back tears.  Around this time of the year, and every year, I remember why our forefathers referred to both Mar Ephrem and Mar Narsai as the “Spiritual Harp”.

Each couplet of the final blessings said by the priests is interspersed with “Yes, Lord” and “Amen”… and kneeling and standing.  Those that can’t kneel as easily, sit, and those who have trouble altogether, can just bow their heads.

I hope these explanations help give a flavor of what is happening.  Perhaps next year, I will be able to post several weeks ahead of time that the fast is approaching, and you can stop by in your local Chaldean Church {or other Eastern Catholic Churches} and experience this service.

The Supplication of the Ninevites
Wednesday

———————

The Begging of Ba’utha

In pain and tears and fervent prayer,
we cry to you, good Lord above!

Be our healer and our wise guide:
deep are our wounds; bitter our pain.

We have no right to plead to you:
our faults abound, our malice soars.

The sea and land, and all therein
have quaked and raged due to our sin.

In our own time, as Scripture says,
the end of days has come upon us.

In mercy, save us from distress,
for height and depth have been confused.

O Good Shepherd, come tend your flock,
for whose sake you endured the cross.

Make peace for us in Church and world,
that we may live a tranquil life.

May we be yours, as is your will:
Father, and Son, and Holy Ghost.

From age to age, amen, amen.

———————

First Madrasha/Meditation

O God  Divine, O hear our pleading heard before you,
and in your mercies, answer the permitted request of our soul.

O Overflowing in his mercies, show forth your love as is your custom,
lest the hater of man mock your handiwork.
O Richer than all, open your treasury to our neediness,
lest we be impoverished and hire ourselves out to the deceiver.
O Mighty of ages, sustain your order by the force of your power,
for lo, it is shaken by the severity of pains and demons. (more…)

Some more prayers from the Rogation of the Ninevites… Tuesday

January 27, 2010

Continuation of the copy and paste {with reformatting} of translations from Kaldu.org

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday

A little explanation for people unfamiliar with this service…  This is not the full service as in the books, but a good amount of translation into English.  I am so happy to see Fr. Andy and the rest of our priests in our diocese working hard to bring a lot of our spirituality out of the Syriac of the Hudra into English for many to rejoice in.  Fr. Andy also translated our Qdam waBathar/”Before and After” into English.  It can be found in Amazon here. God bless him and all our clergy and their helpers in these works.

So, in these three posts, you will see the first couple of lines of the meditations are italicized.  Those lines are repeated as the refrains after each paragraph.  Yes, the entire service is sung… even the long sections called “Readings” which are not in these posts.  They are often very somber toned but nonetheless beautiful hymns.  With the tone and the wording, if I am paying attention to what we are saying and doing, I have to hold back tears.  Around this time of the year, and every year, I remember why our forefathers referred to both Mar Ephrem and Mar Narsai as the “Spiritual Harp”.

Each couplet of the final blessings said by the priests is interspersed with “Yes, Lord” and “Amen”… and kneeling and standing.  Those that can’t kneel as easily, sit, and those who have trouble altogether, can just bow their heads.

I hope these explanations help give a flavor of what is happening.  Perhaps next year, I will be able to post several weeks ahead of time that the fast is approaching, and you can stop by in your local Chaldean Church {or other Eastern Catholic Churches} and experience this service.

The Supplication of the Ninevites
Tuesday

———————

The Begging of Ba’utha

In pain and tears and fervent prayer,
we cry to you, good Lord above!Be our healer and our wise guide:
deep are our wounds; bitter our pain.

We have no right to plead to you:
our faults abound, our malice soars.

The sea and land, and all therein
have quaked and raged due to our sin.

In our own time, as Scripture says,
the end of days has come upon us.

In mercy, save us from distress,
for height and depth have been confused.

O Good Shepherd, come tend your flock,
for whose sake you endured the cross.

Make peace for us in Church and world,
that we may live a tranquil life.

May we be yours, as is your will:
Father, and Son, and Holy Ghost.

From age to age, amen, amen.
———————

First Madrasha/Meditation

O our Creator from nothing, do not reject us like nothingness;
for if our faults are many, your grace is overflowing.

To the support of your mercy do we beg, All-Merciful One:
open the door to our pleading which knocks at the door of your grace.
Hold back your Justice, O Kind One, lest you be embittered by our malice.
Let your Will’s Love pacify you – as you are accustomed to do. (more…)

Some more prayers from the Rogation of the Ninevites… Monday

January 27, 2010

These next three posts are going to be a copy and paste {with reformatting} of translations from Kaldu.org

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday

A little explanation for people unfamiliar with this service…  This is not the full service as in the books, but a good amount of translation into English.  I am so happy to see Fr. Andy and the rest of our priests in our diocese working hard to bring a lot of our spirituality out of the Syriac of the Hudra into English for many to rejoice in.  Fr. Andy also translated our Qdam waBathar/”Before and After” into English.  It can be found in Amazon here. God bless him and all our clergy and their helpers in these works.

So, in these three posts, you will see the first couple of lines of the meditations are italicized.  Those lines are repeated as the refrains after each paragraph.  Yes, the entire service is sung… even the long sections called “Readings” which are not in these posts.  They are often very somber toned but nonetheless beautiful hymns.  With the tone and the wording, if I am paying attention to what we are saying and doing, I have to hold back tears.  Around this time of the year, and every year, I remember why our forefathers referred to both Mar Ephrem and Mar Narsai as the “Spiritual Harp”.

Each couplet of the final blessings said by the priests is interspersed with “Yes, Lord” and “Amen”… and kneeling and standing.  Those that can’t kneel as easily, sit, and those who have trouble altogether, can just bow their heads.

I hope these explanations help give a flavor of what is happening.  Perhaps next year, I will be able to post several weeks ahead of time that the fast is approaching, and you can stop by in your local Chaldean Church {or other Eastern Catholic Churches} and experience this service.

The Supplication of the Ninevites
Monday

———————

The Begging of Ba’utha

In pain and tears and fervent prayer,
we cry to you, good Lord above!

Be our healer and our wise guide:
deep are our wounds; bitter our pain.

We have no right to plead to you:
our faults abound, our malice soars.

The sea and land, and all therein
have quaked and raged due to our sin.

In our own time, as Scripture says,
the end of days has come upon us.

In mercy, save us from distress,
for height and depth have been confused.

O Good Shepherd, come tend your flock,
for whose sake you endured the cross.

Make peace for us in Church and world,
that we may live a tranquil life.

May we be yours, as is your will:
Father, and Son, and Holy Ghost.

From age to age, amen, amen.

———————

First Madrasha/Meditation

Come, let us repent now, while we have time,
lest we repent then, without benefit.

Who is patient enough to speak of your patience with our sins?
If we sin, we become filled with wickedness,
if we do good, we become filled with pride;
and toward one another, we are cruel and merciless:
we are jealous of one who succeeds, we rejoice over one who falls.
And though our life is short, the list of our sins is long. (more…)

Rogation of the Ninevites…

January 27, 2010

The following is a copy and paste of a post made by Fr. Dimitri Grekoff.  It explains what the “Rogation/Fast of the Ninevites” is and why…

Mar Sabrisho’ and the other bishops recommended the fast to the Patriarch Ezekiel who approved it for the entire Church.  This would have been somewhere in 570-580 AD.  It seems that the first two days readings are from the writings of St. Ephrem.  The fact that the Fast of the Ninevites is kept in the Chaldean/Assyrian, Coptic, Ethiopian and the Syriac Orthodox churches, and the usage of writings of St. Ephrem, hints that this fast was something that was practiced in early times, before the split of the various particular churches.  The third day’s poems are from St. Narsai.  Mar Ephrem and Mar Narsai both have the title “the harp of the Spirit” in our church tradition.

Without further delay, here’s the copy-and-paste.

THE ROGATION OF THE NINEVITES

The Reason for the Rogation
The first reason for the Rogation which our Church of God observes is this: There was a petitioning of the Ninevites which at the time took place as a result of the preaching of the prophet Jonah, during which they appointed a fast and clothed themselves in sackcloth, as it is written; and when God saw their repentance he turned from them the heat of his wrath and did not destroy them.
Also there is another reason for which a Rogation is observed at this time among these Assyrians: There was a pestilence, which is called in the world “the plague”, which took place at one time in the kingdom of the Persians, in these our lands, during the days of Mar Sabrisho‘, the metropolitan-bishop of Beit Slokh. It came about because of the multitude of men’s sins, almost consuming and bringing to an end all the men of Beit Garmai, of Assyria, and of Nineveh.
When Mar Sabrisho‘ prayed to God because of the rod of wrath which was destroying his flock he heard the voice of an angel saying, “Proclaim a fast and make petition, and the pestilence will be removed from you.” At once this holy man commanded that the people of the Lord should assemble with him in all their ranks at the house of the Lord; and on the first day of the petitioning, which was a Monday, the hand of the destroying angel drew back, and no one was smitten. Only a few died, that is, some of those who had been [previously] struck down and afflicted by the pestilence. (more…)