Posts Tagged ‘Chaldean’

Antiochian vs. Mesopotamian

February 27, 2013

This post comes as a reflection based on thinking back on Fr. Andrew’s book {see Lenten readings post below}, and the book of John Moolan on the Annunciation, and is not fully developed, but just something thrown out there for discussion in case someone wants to discuss.

Many people go through life not realizing that there is a distinction in the Mesopotamian School and the Antiochian School.  Both are influenced by Semitic thought, and both are Eastern, and the Antiochian school had influence over the entire world: Theodore was read in Spain as much as he was read in Iran.  Theodore’s writings was accepted in the Mesopotamian Church because of the reputation of his person and his writing, and also because it was in line with its own system. (more…)

On The Incarnation Part 3… Soteriological – As an Example

August 8, 2012

In the previous part of this discussion, we reflected on the self-emptying of Christ.  St. Paul asks that his readers imitate that self-emptying.  The Catechism of the Catholic Church teaches that one of the reasons for the Incarnation of the Word is: (more…)

On The Incarnation Part 2… Soteriological – Lift Up Our Nature

August 8, 2012

The Incarnation took place in the plan of God for the emancipation of our human race from slavery to sin.  It must be looked at in a soteriological context, and as such its links to the Crucifixion/Resurrection must be acknowledged.  The events of Easter were in God’s plan even as the Incarnation happened. Peter emphasizes this when addressing the gathered crowd regarding the Messiah death and resurrection (Acts 2:22-24): (more…)

On The Incarnation Part 1… From the Church of the East Fathers.

August 6, 2012

Thanksgiving Hymn of Mar Narsai:

The great love which the Lover of our race showed us is indescribable:
For from our race, he made a Mediator, and he reconciled the world with his Majesty.
It is a thing too great for us and all creatures;
it is a new thing he has done for our humanity:
that he has made our body a holy temple, in which he fulfills the worship of all.
Come, O earthly and heavenly, wonder and marvel at the greatness of our station:
for our race has reached the great height of incomprehensible Divinity!
Heaven and earth and all therein give thanks to the Magnifier of our race,
For he renewed our image and wiped away our iniquity,
called us in his Name and made all things subject to us. (more…)

Theotokos in the Church of the East

March 9, 2012

In 2005, the status of the Blessed Virgin Mother as the Theotokos was surprisingly something that did not generate a lot of online debate.  The only assertion I made was the following post: (more…)

Iconography in the Church of the East

February 22, 2012

During my transition from the Assyrian into the Chaldean Church, one of the subjects that came up during discussions with others was the status of icons.  This was a minor issue in that it was questioned only by members who had no knowledge of the venerable history of the Church of the East.  As was posted during these times: (more…)

May and St. Mary

August 22, 2011

May is a month dedicated to St. Mary.  The association of the month with Mary was established in the West probably in the 13th century., the link perhaps coming about as the Christian baptizing of pagan harvest feasts, yet the connection of the Holy Mother to the harvest feasts came about much earlier. (more…)

Celebrating Full Unity

March 2, 2010

The following article was taken from Kaldu.org.  This is a news report on a joyous visit from our bishop Mar Sarhad.  Our newly united parish celebrated the Holy Offering with the new reformed missal.

On Sunday, February 21, 2010, in an unprecedented gathering of Christian unity and solidarity, over 400 faithful parishioners packed the standing-room-only St. Mary’s Assyrian Chaldean Catholic Church to mark the beginning of a new chapter in the history of our beloved Church and Diocese.  During this blessed day of prayer, the parishioners were introduced to the newly reformed mass, reflecting the authentic and cherished heritage of our forefather, the Church of the East.  The beautiful mass was lead by our spiritual leader, His Grace Mar Sarhad Yosip Jammo and the two parish priests, Father Youshia Sana and Chorbishop Samuel Dinkha, who were accompanied by a large number of Deacons and the mesmerizing voice of a 40-member strong choir. (more…)

Some more prayers from the Rogation of the Ninevites… Wednesday

January 27, 2010

This is the last part of my copy and paste {with reformatting} of translations from Kaldu.org… The Wednesday page has readings as well as the meditations.

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday

A little explanation for people unfamiliar with this service…  This is not the full service as in the books, but a good amount of translation into English.  I am so happy to see Fr. Andy and the rest of our priests in our diocese working hard to bring a lot of our spirituality out of the Syriac of the Hudra into English for many to rejoice in.  Fr. Andy also translated our Qdam waBathar/”Before and After” into English.  It can be found in Amazon here. God bless him and all our clergy and their helpers in these works.

So, in these three posts, you will see the first couple of lines of the meditations are italicized.  Those lines are repeated as the refrains after each paragraph.  Yes, the entire service is sung… even the long sections called “Readings” which are not in these posts.  They are often very somber toned but nonetheless beautiful hymns.  With the tone and the wording, if I am paying attention to what we are saying and doing, I have to hold back tears.  Around this time of the year, and every year, I remember why our forefathers referred to both Mar Ephrem and Mar Narsai as the “Spiritual Harp”.

Each couplet of the final blessings said by the priests is interspersed with “Yes, Lord” and “Amen”… and kneeling and standing.  Those that can’t kneel as easily, sit, and those who have trouble altogether, can just bow their heads.

I hope these explanations help give a flavor of what is happening.  Perhaps next year, I will be able to post several weeks ahead of time that the fast is approaching, and you can stop by in your local Chaldean Church {or other Eastern Catholic Churches} and experience this service.

The Supplication of the Ninevites
Wednesday

———————

The Begging of Ba’utha

In pain and tears and fervent prayer,
we cry to you, good Lord above!

Be our healer and our wise guide:
deep are our wounds; bitter our pain.

We have no right to plead to you:
our faults abound, our malice soars.

The sea and land, and all therein
have quaked and raged due to our sin.

In our own time, as Scripture says,
the end of days has come upon us.

In mercy, save us from distress,
for height and depth have been confused.

O Good Shepherd, come tend your flock,
for whose sake you endured the cross.

Make peace for us in Church and world,
that we may live a tranquil life.

May we be yours, as is your will:
Father, and Son, and Holy Ghost.

From age to age, amen, amen.

———————

First Madrasha/Meditation

O God  Divine, O hear our pleading heard before you,
and in your mercies, answer the permitted request of our soul.

O Overflowing in his mercies, show forth your love as is your custom,
lest the hater of man mock your handiwork.
O Richer than all, open your treasury to our neediness,
lest we be impoverished and hire ourselves out to the deceiver.
O Mighty of ages, sustain your order by the force of your power,
for lo, it is shaken by the severity of pains and demons. (more…)

Some more prayers from the Rogation of the Ninevites… Tuesday

January 27, 2010

Continuation of the copy and paste {with reformatting} of translations from Kaldu.org

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday

A little explanation for people unfamiliar with this service…  This is not the full service as in the books, but a good amount of translation into English.  I am so happy to see Fr. Andy and the rest of our priests in our diocese working hard to bring a lot of our spirituality out of the Syriac of the Hudra into English for many to rejoice in.  Fr. Andy also translated our Qdam waBathar/”Before and After” into English.  It can be found in Amazon here. God bless him and all our clergy and their helpers in these works.

So, in these three posts, you will see the first couple of lines of the meditations are italicized.  Those lines are repeated as the refrains after each paragraph.  Yes, the entire service is sung… even the long sections called “Readings” which are not in these posts.  They are often very somber toned but nonetheless beautiful hymns.  With the tone and the wording, if I am paying attention to what we are saying and doing, I have to hold back tears.  Around this time of the year, and every year, I remember why our forefathers referred to both Mar Ephrem and Mar Narsai as the “Spiritual Harp”.

Each couplet of the final blessings said by the priests is interspersed with “Yes, Lord” and “Amen”… and kneeling and standing.  Those that can’t kneel as easily, sit, and those who have trouble altogether, can just bow their heads.

I hope these explanations help give a flavor of what is happening.  Perhaps next year, I will be able to post several weeks ahead of time that the fast is approaching, and you can stop by in your local Chaldean Church {or other Eastern Catholic Churches} and experience this service.

The Supplication of the Ninevites
Tuesday

———————

The Begging of Ba’utha

In pain and tears and fervent prayer,
we cry to you, good Lord above!Be our healer and our wise guide:
deep are our wounds; bitter our pain.

We have no right to plead to you:
our faults abound, our malice soars.

The sea and land, and all therein
have quaked and raged due to our sin.

In our own time, as Scripture says,
the end of days has come upon us.

In mercy, save us from distress,
for height and depth have been confused.

O Good Shepherd, come tend your flock,
for whose sake you endured the cross.

Make peace for us in Church and world,
that we may live a tranquil life.

May we be yours, as is your will:
Father, and Son, and Holy Ghost.

From age to age, amen, amen.
———————

First Madrasha/Meditation

O our Creator from nothing, do not reject us like nothingness;
for if our faults are many, your grace is overflowing.

To the support of your mercy do we beg, All-Merciful One:
open the door to our pleading which knocks at the door of your grace.
Hold back your Justice, O Kind One, lest you be embittered by our malice.
Let your Will’s Love pacify you – as you are accustomed to do. (more…)